Kamara Townes tackles cultural appropriation, fetishization, casual and systematic racism in her art (Sponsored Content) | Art Reviews + Features | Pittsburgh | Pittsburgh City Paper

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Kamara Townes tackles cultural appropriation, fetishization, casual and systematic racism in her art (Sponsored Content)

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Protect Black Women is the first solo exhibition by emerging artist Kamara Townes, who goes professionally by Wavy Wednesday. Kamara is a Clairton native, and a 2018 graduate of Cal U of Pennsylvania. Her work has been featured on public murals in Clairton, Brian Burley’s “YNGBLKPGH” book, and popular social media sites Afropunk and The Shade Room.

In this exhibit of both painting and installation, she uses her works, which are a highly contemporary survey of popular culture, to send a strong, positive message about Black Women in America, as seen through their eyes.

Using the backdrop of American institutions like Barbie, Kamara tackles political and current issues like cultural appropriation, fetishization, casual and systematic racism in a playful, but powerful tone.

Kamara's controversial artwork also serves as activism. Her works often garner many detractors along with admirers, spurring passionate, insightful debates that are both enlightening and culturally important and relevant. More than anything, Kamara’s artwork and Protect Black Women, the exhibition represent the NOW.

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