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Silk Screen Film Festival

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The fifth annual Silk Screen Asian American Film Festival continues through Sun., May 16. The festival offers recent features from the Far East and Southeast Asia, as well as the United States and Iran, representing the diversity of Asian and Asian-American experiences. 

Films screen at the Harris (809 Liberty Ave., Downtown); the Regent Square (1035 S. Braddock Ave., Edgewood); and the Melwood Screening Room (477 Melwood Ave., North Oakland).

Tickets for regular screenings are $9 ($5 for students). Additionally, an eight-film pass is available for $50. For more information and to purchase tickets online, see www.silkscreenfestival.org.

 

The remaining films are as follows:

 

ABOUT ELLY. A group of thirtysomething Iranian couples and their children set up for a few days' vacation at a beach house. One wife has invited a casual acquaintance, Elly, with an eye toward fixing her up with one of the single men. It all seems reasonable and harmless, until an unexpected occurrence shatters the holiday -- and reveals all the social fault-lines and minefields in contemporary Iranian culture. Asghar Farhad's ensemble drama, shot intimately with handheld cameras, begins slowly, but soon acquires the intensity of a thriller. In Farsi, with subtitles. 9:30 p.m. Thu., May 13, and 7 p.m. Sat., May 15. Regent Square

ADRIFT. Bui Thac Chuyen's film examines the desires, fulfilled and otherwise, in an unhappy marriage. In Vietnamese, with subtitles. 7:30 p.m. Wed., May 12, and 7:30 p.m. Sun., May 16. Melwood

BARAH AANA. Three friends in Mumbai turn to petty crime, but it only leads -- naturally -- to trouble. Raja Menon directs this dramedy. In Hindi, with subtitles. 4:30 p.m. Sat., May 15. Melwood

A BRAND NEW LIFE. In Ounie Lecomte's drama, a 9-year-old Korean girl adapts after being dumped by her father at an orphanage. In Korean, with subtitles. 7 p.m. Fri., May 14. Melwood

FOG. Against the backdrop of Hong Kong's 10-year anniversary of rejoining China, an amnesiac young man named Wai struggles to piece together who he was -- and who he might be. Kit Hui's understated drama lightly sketches in some of Wai's character and backstory, but leaves viewers, like the protagonist, mulling over the gaps. Those who need explicit answers may be dissatisfied, but the more observant will note that Wai does make significant gains. In Cantonese, with subtitles. 7:30 p.m. Thu., May 13, and 9:30 p.m. Sat., May 15. Regent Square

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THE HARIMAYA BRIDGE. An older African-American man, with deep-seated resentments about Japan, is forced to confront his prejudices after the untimely death of his son. As part of his healing process, the father travels to Japan, where his son taught art, and discovers others, including his son's young Japanese widow, have also been profoundly hurt by the loss. Aaron Woolfolk's drama treads familiar ground -- child/parent traumas, cultural differences, learning to forgive -- in a relaxed style that ultimately overcomes the film's earlier clunkiness. In English and Japanese, with subtitles. 6:30 p.m. Sat., May 15, and 3 p.m. Sun., May 16. Melwood

HEIRAN. A young Afghani immigrant and the poor Iranian girl with whom he falls in love try to start a new life together in Tehran, despite the objections of her family. Shalizeh Arefpour directs. In Farsi, with subtitles. 3 p.m. Sat., May 15. Regent Square

MAKE YOURSELF AT HOME. Soopum Sohn's film is a slow-boil of a psychological thriller that takes its cues from Korean horror myths and contemporary Western films about deranged psychosexual relationships (Fatal Attraction, Single White Female). Julie is the young Korean bride who moves to her husband's home in suburban New Jersey, where she tackles her new life with admirable, if inappropriate, gusto. In English and some Korean, with subtitles. 8:30 p.m. Sat., May 15. Melwood

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THE MOUNTAIN THIEF. A young man and his disabled son flee warfare in their small village, instead hoping to better their fortunes by scavenging at Payatas, the Philippines' largest landfill. They join the other trash-pickers, who live on site in a barely-there shantytown called Mount Hope. Most are welcoming, but a disagreement flares up which threatens both the livelihood and the lives of Mount Hope's two newest citizens. Director Gerry Balasta merges a neo-realist style -- this is no set, and he employed Mount Hope' residents exclusively -- with a smattering of non-linear storytelling. The setting is grim, yet the story of unimaginable daily endurance is not without hope, despite the enigmatic ending. In Tagalog, with subtitles. 5 p.m. Sat., May 15, and 3 p.m. Sun., May 16. Regent Square (AH)

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THE PEOPLE I'VE SLEPT WITH. A lively -- and very sexually active -- woman in Los Angeles turns up pregnant, and wonders which of her many lovers might be the daddy. Quentin Lee directs this comedy. 7 p.m. Fri., May 14, and 5 p.m. Sun., May 16. Regent Square

THE SHAFT. In Zhang Chi's critically acclaimed drama, an elderly man and his two adult children struggle to fulfill their desires, while living in a remote coal-mining town in Western China. In Mandarin, with subtitles. 9 p.m. Fri., May 14. Melwood

THE TAQWACORES. Eyad Zahra's film, a Sundance hit, depicts the rowdy life among a group of punk-rock-lovin' young Muslims in Buffalo. 8 p.m. Wed., May 12, and 9 p.m. Fri., May 14. Regent Square

VACATION. The relationship between a prison guard and a death-row inmate is explored in Hajime Kadoi's drama. In Japanese, with subtitles. 7:30 p.m. Thu., May 13. Melwood

WALKING TO SCHOOL. Peng Jiahuang and Peng Chen's film looks at the lives of two children in a remote mountain village in China's Yunnan province. In Mandarin and Lisu, with subtitles. 5:30 p.m. Sun., May 16. Melwood

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