Short List: Jan 20 - 27 | Short List | Pittsburgh | Pittsburgh City Paper

Listings » Short List

Short List: Jan 20 - 27

Downtown Gallery Crawl; The Rec Room: Winter Games debuts at Spirit; Little Women at Pittsburgh Opera; Quantum’s U.S. premiere of Ciara

by

comment

SPOTLIGHT: Fri., Jan. 22 — Art

An obvious highlight of this week’s Gallery Crawl is the first art exhibit in the revived August Wilson Center. The Other Side of Pop, curated by Sean Beauford, features artists seeking “to connect with those who observe pop culture as portrayed by mass media but may not be able to relate to it.” The group show includes work by New York City graffitti artist Cey Adams; Saudi-born RexChouk; New York’s LinShuttr, Justin Gilzene and Molly Goldfarb; and Pittsburgh’s Magic Organs and Amani Davis. The Center also opens Great Performances, with freshly curated work from the archive of famed photographer Teenie Harris. Elsewhere at the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust-sponsored Crawl, Wood Street Galleries opens Pastoral Noir: New English Landscapes, a multimedia group show. Shaw Galleries holds its Sixth Annual Bad Art Sale (“at rock-bottom prices!”). The Trust Arts Education Center hosts the album-release for Christiane D’s Amor Fati. The Winter Night Market is indoors at 925 Liberty Ave., with food and drink, jewelry, crafts and more. And CrawlAfterDark includes a 9:30 p.m. Harris Theater screening of The Decline of Western Civilization III, Penelope Spheeris’ 1998 documentary about Los Angeles gutter punks ($5), and #CRAWLSPACE, a 10 p.m. improv show about art and social media that teams the Trust, Arcade Comedy Theater, the Carnegie Museum of Art and, um, Twitter. Bill O’Driscoll 5:30-10 p.m. Fri., Jan. 22. Downtown. Free. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

Thu., Jan. 21 — Party

The Carnegie Museum of Art debuts its new monthly party. For Third Thursdays, the museum stays open late and teams with different groups around town for art, music, a late-night café menu and more. Tonight’s inaugural event is a collabo with BOOM Concepts that includes a silent disco (DJ beats on wireless headphones) in the Hall of Sculpture; “an unconventional gallery tour by local creatives”; and a sneak peak at the new Teenie Harris photography show, Great Performances Off-Stage, spotlighting performers in Pittsburgh’s African-American community from 1935 to 1980. Bill O’Driscoll 8-11 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $5-10. 412-622-3131 or www.cmoa.org

sl_maximum_03.jpg

Fri., Jan. 22 — Art

Maximum Minimum in Unum is the tongue-twisting title of the new group show at Miller Gallery. The exhibit, curated by Joshua Reiman and Susanne Slavick, gathers work by 14 artists or groups whose creations are neither maximalist nor minimalist, even when they go to extremes. The 14 contributors — all nationally or internationally exhibited alums of Carnegie Mellon University’s School of Art — include: Diane Samuels (known for creating massive amounts of tiny, hand-written text); Ron Desmett (imaginative glassworks); and Gregory Witt (mechanical assemblages, often incorporating video). The Institute for New Feeling performs at tonight’s opening reception. BO 6-8 p.m. (free). Exhibit continues through Feb. 28. CMU campus, Oakland. Free. RSVP at millergallery.cfa.cmu.edu.

sl_tetris_03.jpg

Fri., Jan. 22 — Stage

Trading blocks for bodies in an acrobatic display, TetrisPlus is a children’s play performed by Netherlands troupe Arch 8. The show illustrates the idea of fitting into a group through its storyline and its performers’ matching knack for twisting, turning and climbing, encouraging the audience to do the same. Courtesy of the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, this interactive event continues the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust’s EQT Bridge Theater Series. See how you stack up today and tomorrow at the area premiere, at the August Wilson Center. Courtney Linder 7 p.m. Also 2 p.m. Sat., Jan. 23. 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $10.50-12. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

Sat., Jan. 23 — Gaming

Fight disease in both real life and the virtual world at Pittsburgh’s Retro Gaming Convention, today at Xtaza nightclub. Among its many vendors and opportunities for old-school play — including tabletop games, a Super Smash Bros Melee tournament and a cosplay contest — there’s a preview of a new game. Germ Squashers, a cross-platform experience created by local outfit 8 Bit Evolution, allows you to defeat germs to earn a Super Flu Shot. All proceeds from the convention benefit Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh, as do profits from Germ Squashers. CL 10 a.m.-3 p.m. 1630 Smallman St., Strip District. $15 ($20 for early-bird access). james@8bitevolution.com or www.PittsburghRetroGaming.com

PHOTO COURTESY OF CHRIS POLLACK
  • Photo courtesy of Chris Pollack

Sat., Jan. 23 — Sport

The Wheel Mill hosts its biggest BMX event of the year. The Winter Welcome Jam is a full day of riding and spectating for visitors of all ages and skill levels at this former industrial building in Homewood, now kitted out with ramps and trails for cyclists. The evening portion includes local bands and, for those over 21, a full bar. BO Opens at noon. 6815 Hamilton Ave., Homewood. Riders: $16.99-25.99; spectators: $5. www.thewheelmill.com

PHOTO COURTESY OF CHRIS IVEY
  • Photo courtesy of Chris Ivey

Sat., Jan. 23 — Screen

In 2005, when filmmaker Chris Ivey began shooting his three-part documentary East of Liberty, “gentrification” wasn’t a word much heard in Pittsburgh. These days, the series’ themes of gentrification, displacement, class and race seem more relevant than ever. Today, the Kelly-Strayhorn Theater screens all three films, subtitled A Story of Good Intentions, The Fear of Us (focusing on small-businesspeople) and In Unlivable Times (featuring local youths). A discussion with Ivey and other experts follows the free screening. BO Screenings: 2, 3:40 and 5:30 p.m. Mixer: 6:30 p.m. Discussion: 7-9 p.m. 5941 Penn Ave., East Liberty. Free. 412-363-3000 or www.kelly-strayhorn.org

Sat., July 23 — Art

BoxHeart Gallery received hundreds of entries from around the world for its 15th — and, the gallery says, final — Art Inter/National Exhibition. The 25 submissions by 22 artists that it finally selected include works on canvas and paper, in mixed media, porcelain and more, from as near as Pittsburgh and as distant as India, Crete and Ecuador. Meet the artists at tonight’s opening reception. BO 5-8 p.m. (free). Exhibit continues through March 4. 4523 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-687-8858 or www.boxheartgallery.com

Sat., Jan. 23 — Opera

Catch Louisa May Alcott’s classic Little Women as revitalized in Mark Adamo’s world-touring 1999 operatic adaption. The show receives its Pittsburgh premiere tonight, in the first of four Pittsburgh Opera performances. Adamo’s libretto puts a fresh spin on Alcott’s 19th-century coming-of-age narrative, complete with rhyming couplets. Starring all seven of the Opera’s Resident Artists, the production features mezzo-soprano Corrie Stallings as Jo, and tenor Adam Bonanni as Laurie. Get your tickets quickly though, because the intimate CAPA Theatre is sure to sell out. CL 8 p.m. Continues through Jan. 31. 111 Ninth St., Downtown. $50.75-60.75. 412-456-6666 or www.PittsburghOpera.org

Sun., Jan. 24 — Play

Groups that tempt you outside, like City of Play and Weather Permitting, are joining indoorsy types Pandemic and Schell Games for The Rec Room: Winter Games. The series of five events runs every other Sunday starting today, with novel games, bands and beer at Spirit Hall. The inaugural week’s games include Bally (“four-square with nine squares”), GaGa (Israeli dodgeball) Bucket Pong (giant-sized beer pong) and Searchlight, a cooperative two-person team game (race the clock to collect colored blocks before a searchlight “freezes” you). There’s also COP fave Johann Sebastian Joust — a dancing tag game played with a glowing orb to a pre-recorded soundtrack of Bach — and Weather Permitting standby Stump (about hammering nails into … a stump!). Andre Costello and the Cool Minors play; Miss Mungo DJs. In future weeks, expect new games and performers. BO 3-8 p.m. Also Feb. 7 and 21, and March 6 and 20. 242 52nd St., Lawrenceville. $10. www.cityofplay.org

sl_tstmrkt_03.jpg

Tue., Jan. 26 — Comedy

Ever get disgruntled with self-checkout kiosks and want to rip your pants off in protest? This frustration begins “DVDA,” a sketch by Las Vegas-based comedic performance-art group TSTMRKT, comprised of Ernest Hemmings and Breon Jenay. The sketch is set-less and prop-less, but the duo’s offbeat humor is complemented by pre-recorded audio and looping film projections. Milwaukee’s Shepherd Express calls TSTMRKT’s show “high risk” and “a thinking production.” Tonight’s show at Bloomfield artspace The Shop begins the group’s seven-city Midwest tour. Laugh your pants off. CL 9 p.m. 4314 Main St., Bloomfield. $10. 702-412-8550 or www.tstmrkt.com

Wed., Jan. 27 — Stage

It’s a coup for Quantum Theatre, as the company presents the American premiere of a 2013 work by a major playwright. David Harrower’s Ciara is a monologue by the title character, the daughter of a Glasgow mobster who left a life of crime to run an art gallery and champion local artists. The Scottish playwright’s previous works include Knives in Hens. In Ciara, Karla Boos directs local favorite Mary Rawson on a set designed by iconic Pittsburgh artist Robert Qualters for the venue: Lawrenceville’s Javo Studios. BO 8 p.m. Continues through Feb. 14. 5137 Holmes St., Lawrenceville. $18-51. 412-362-1713 or www.quantumtheatre.com


Tags

Add a comment