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New releases from Silencio, Icarus Witch and Ralph Peterson

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Silencio
Silencio
(Self-released)

This group formed to play music from David Lynch's TV and film oeuvre, largely composed by Angelo Badalamenti; the members have since written a good bit of their own material inspired by same. Complex compositions, from reverb-y old-time pop to jazz noir, with haunting vocals by Dessa Poljak. Beautiful and, yes, cinematic.

— Andy Mulkerin

SILENCIO CD RELEASE. 9 p.m. Sat., June 30. Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. 412-431-4950

Icarus Witch
Rise
(Cleopatra Records)

Icarus Witch's fifth album for Cleopatra packs quite an arena-rock punch, channeling elements of '80s glam-metal acts akin to Mötley Crüe and modern metal acts like Bullet for My Valentine and Killswitch Engage. Rise creates the soundtrack for a barroom brawl, with enough grit to please even the stingiest metal fan. 

— Gregg Harrington

ICARUS WITCH CD RELEASE. 9:30 p.m. Fri., July 6. Smiling Moose, 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-431-4668

Ralph Peterson 
The Duality Perspective 
(Onyx Music) 

Robinson’s Sean Jones plays vigorous, intricate solos on three of five sextet numbers on this very appealing 10-track straight-ahead jazz set assembled by drummer Peterson. Peterson wrote eight pieces and arranged everything and came up with colorful and original-sounding themes and harmonies. Half of this features a quartet bound to leave a strong impression, given the interesting and rare combination of clarinets and vibes. The still-emerging artists on those instruments are Peterson’s students at Berklee College of Music; they bear further watching and hearing. Joseph Doubleday plays vibrant vibes and Felix Peikli does great things on clarinets. As for the other half of the CD, Tia Fuller’s soprano saxophone surges with special invention. Peterson takes a few solos amid both ensembles, as do bassists Alexander L.J. Toth in the first and Luques Curtis in the other. Curtis has often played with Jones. Also well-accounted for is tenor sax player Walter Smith III.  

— Gordon Spencer

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