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A Modest Roundup of (Im)pertinent Media about the Current Administration

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"The Path to War." If W. keeps insisting Saddam Hussein was a huge threat to world security, say this for him: At least he's been consistently misleading. In a massive Vanity Fair article (May), Bryan Burrough, Evgenia Peretz, David Rose and David Wise track the decision to invade Iraq from its ideological roots in the Bush I White House through this administration's pigheaded dismissal of any evidence that didn't jibe with its view of Iraq and the winding detours it made to solicit even the flimsiest of reports that did. Perhaps most concisely damning is "The Deceptions Exposed," an accompanying annotation adapted from intelligence expert John Prados' new New Press book Hoodwinked: The Documents That Reveal How Bush Sold Us a War. Prados demonstrates how the CIA's influential October 2002 "White Paper" summation of a National Intelligence Estimate report distorted the intelligence that was fed to Congress and the American public in making the case for war.

 

"Mel Goodman on 9/11 Commission." The 9/11 Commission hearings have been news for weeks, but we shouldn't forget who appointed its members: George W. Bush. And, says Melvin Goodman, we shouldn't mistake the information that's come out of those hearings for a thorough investigation. "This is a very timid commission" that went after Richard Clarke instead of real security issues, says Goodman, a former CIA official and author of Bush League Diplomacy. In an interview on media-watchdog radio show Counterspin (April 2), Goodman addresses some of those issues and debunks media myths about Bush anti-terrorism efforts. www.fair.org/counterspin/040204.html. Real Audio or MP3 format.  (Counterspin airs locally at 7:30 p.m. Wednesdays on WYEP 91.3 FM.)

 

"Injudicious." It's one of those drab-sounding bodies, but the Senate Committee on the Judiciary, which scrutinizes presidential nominees for the federal bench, is quite relevant. Witness Bush and the Republicans' ham-fisted takeover of the committee as detailed by Heidi Pauken in The American Prospect (April). Eager to have the committee churn out little Scalias and Thomases, the Republicans have replaced a one-time collegiality with partisan power plays. Bush himself has chipped in by making previously little-used  "recess appointments" -- allowing his bench picks to serve temporarily while awaiting future confirmation, and posing resultant threats to Roe v. Wade, civil rights, workers' rights and more. Meanwhile, Bush labels committee Dems "obstructionist." www.prospect.org

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